"Unschooling"

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Postby Jeannine Stergios » Sat Mar 17, 2007 12:47 pm

Nat

I agree with you. What they should be doing is finding employers willing to hire these dropouts in a paid work-study program.

I'm willing to be one of two things will happen, They will learn a skill from the workstudy or they will realize school wasn't such a bad place after all and return.

Forcing them to stay in school will cost us more money. Many who drop out sit around at home and often turn to crime and drugs. Instead I would offer this type of paid work study aka internship as an option.

I still believe they should receive career testing once they enter 9th grade so they can channel their talents and interests into a marketable skill.
REPUBLICAN - BECAUSE NOT EVERYONE CAN BE ON WELFARE
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Postby RFTO1111 » Sat Mar 17, 2007 4:13 pm

Jeannine - "I still believe they should receive career testing once they enter 9th grade so they can channel their talents and interests into a marketable skill."

Not a bad idea, but frankly if a kid once he hits the 9th grade wants to quit, so be it, I don't care what age they are. I certainly will not lose any sleep over it. At that age, as in any age, I think it is the parents responsibility. I know I would never let my kids quit school until they graduated. As far as quitting at that age and getting in to trouble as some have mentioned, whoop dee doo, arrest them and lock them up if they break the law. I cannot feel compassion for any smart ass kid that has no desire to learn, only to disrupt the kids that want to be there.
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Postby Nat Fairbanks » Sat Mar 17, 2007 10:19 pm

Wayne wrote:
Nat Fairbanks wrote:As the son of two teachers I can tell you without a doubt there is no better way to harm education than keep students in school who do not want to be there.

Then what's the alternative? Just letting them drop out of society has consequences both for them and for us. You just can't get very far without at least a basic education.

While I'm sure there are a few exceptional dropouts who go on to do great things with their lives in most cases dropping out of school will force the dropout into menial labor jobs at low wages. That's their choice. They also have the choice to go back to school or get a GED. They will not be getting even a basic education if they remain in school and their presence there will cause good students to get a lesser education than they deserve and desire. It may even cause some to get such a poor education that a student who is deserving of a better chance becomes fated to a life of menial labor and low wages due to the severe disruptions in class.

-Nat
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Postby RD » Sun Mar 18, 2007 8:43 am

Nat Fairbanks wrote:While I'm sure there are a few exceptional dropouts who go on to do great things with their lives in most cases dropping out of school will force the dropout into menial labor jobs at low wages. That's their choice.

I don't think those kids have the tools and guidance to make a better choice. If we raise the dropout age to 18, then we are not even giving them that choice. Also, the longer a kid like that stays in school, the more chance there is that he will receive good guidance, that a teacher may be able to get through to him and motivate him, and that he will graduate. If he manages to graduate, he will be able to get a much better job, and will be less likely to spend the rest of his life in poverty, and pass that poverty on to his children, and grandchildren, and so on. That would be beneficial for all of us.
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Postby RD » Sun Mar 18, 2007 8:46 am

Jeannine Stergios wrote:I still believe they should receive career testing once they enter 9th grade so they can channel their talents and interests into a marketable skill.

I agree Jeannine. When I was a kid, after 8th grade, a percentage (albeit a small one) of my classmates went on to trade-oriented high schools intead of traditional high school. Does that option even still exist?
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Postby Ann Goldman » Sun Mar 18, 2007 10:34 am

Jeannine Stergios wrote:Nat

I agree with you. What they should be doing is finding employers willing to hire these dropouts in a paid work-study program.

I'm willing to be one of two things will happen, They will learn a skill from the workstudy or they will realize school wasn't such a bad place after all and return.

Forcing them to stay in school will cost us more money. Many who drop out sit around at home and often turn to crime and drugs. Instead I would offer this type of paid work study aka internship as an option.

I still believe they should receive career testing once they enter 9th grade so they can channel their talents and interests into a marketable skill.


You bring up some valid points. I like the idea of a paid work-study program.

I am not sure how I feel about raising the minimum school age. I can see problems and benefits. Perhaps the jump to 18 is too big of a jump. Maybe 17 is a better age.

Although forcing kids to stay in school will cost more money, letting them drop out costs money too. Turning to crime only increases our costs for legal action and prison. Nothing is free.

The work-study idea seems like it may be the most cost-effective approach.
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Postby mmoy » Sun Mar 18, 2007 1:10 pm

RD wrote:
Jeannine Stergios wrote:I still believe they should receive career testing once they enter 9th grade so they can channel their talents and interests into a marketable skill.

I agree Jeannine. When I was a kid, after 8th grade, a percentage (albeit a small one) of my classmates went on to trade-oriented high schools intead of traditional high school. Does that option even still exist?


This could be done at a place like NHCTC in Nashua.

It would make for an interesting option: at 16, give the student the money to attend NHCTC. I think that tuition there is between $5,000 and $6,000 per year. The student and his parents would be responsible for transportation and books.
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