Note to trustees, not for lack of prep

Moderator: The Merrimack Volunteer Moderators

Note to trustees, not for lack of prep

Postby pnaber » Wed Apr 09, 2003 4:07 am

I have to give a hat's off to the preparation in the new library efforts. The background and presentations and justifications were all top notch. Very little controversy over the facts of the matter, the data was all presented in an open manner.

To the need for a new library, there can be no doubt.

I can only hope that the same team comes back next year.

Pat Naber
pnaber
 
Posts: 79
Joined: Thu Nov 21, 2002 5:53 pm

Postby Mike Scopa » Wed Apr 09, 2003 7:16 am

I think the key here was timing. If there were fewer big ticket items for the town to vote on yesterday then the library would have stood a better chance of passing.

The decision to put this before the town the same year the town was being asked to consider building as new school was very much a risk.

All the arguments for a new library are certainly justified...but as I had mentioned in another post in this forum, it comes down to economics.

Voters rarely decide on the right thing to do, but instead the "economical" thing to do.

Mike
Mike Scopa
 
Posts: 200
Joined: Thu Nov 21, 2002 11:49 am
Location: Merrimack, N.H.

Postby pnaber » Wed Apr 09, 2003 7:30 am

Economics though is exactly the point.

Very few people will continue to repair a car every year. Eventually they replace it. When they get in the new car, they realize the radio was bad, heat was non-existent, wipers squeaked and so on. Only in a new car do they come to the realization that the car should have been replaced long ago.

The trash quagmire and the school will be on the tax rate for a long time to come. Using economics means putting the library off for 30 years.

We know the citizens in town are losing out by the "work arounds" in place currently at the library, unfortunately we won't be able to discover just how many things are being restricted yet. Just like that old car, the library should have been replaced the first time on the ballot.
pnaber
 
Posts: 79
Joined: Thu Nov 21, 2002 5:53 pm

Postby Pat Heinrich » Sat Apr 12, 2003 9:25 am

Thank you all for your good words of encouragement and for supporting continued saving for a new library.

What we are hearing was that the town just didn't feel it could handle so many big ticket items in the same year. So the economical arguement does make sense.

What is interesing is that the town DID support the continued savings for a new library....which will be a combined total of $500,000. And the cost to the taxpayer to bond the library in its most expensive year was $500,000! So economics was WHY the library bond was placed on the warrant this year.

However, as all have said, the school and the trash issue were must be solved issues and are now taken care of. So next year, the town can look at other things that are needed (like the library) without the shadow of major controversial issues.
Pat Heinrich
 
Posts: 378
Joined: Thu Nov 21, 2002 7:38 am

Postby Jerry Bull » Tue Apr 15, 2003 3:05 pm

What is interesing is that the town DID support the continued savings for a new library....which will be a combined total of $500,000. And the cost to the taxpayer to bond the library in its most expensive year was $500,000! So economics was WHY the library bond was placed on the warrant this year.


Unfortunately, the reality of this economic benefit seems to have been lost on many voters. We ourselves weren't entirely clear on this point until attending the town deliberative session. (Fine presentation, by the way.) Right up until election day, we found ourselves encountering voters who were "disappointed" (if not downright dismayed) that the Library Trustees had chosen to place this proposition back on the ballot in light of the pending trash issues and School District's needs. And while a quick explanation of the economics helped redirect many a mind from merely continuing the capital reserve to the benefit of bonding now, we still believe the message wasn't out there loudly and clearly enough to be heard over other issues.

Should bond interest rate trends continue, we certainly hope the Trustees will continue to promote the economics of the message, and perhaps try again next Spring.

Jerry & Tracy Bull
Jerry Bull
 
Posts: 15
Joined: Fri Mar 21, 2003 7:53 am

Bond Rates Continue to Decline

Postby Tom Mahon » Fri Jun 20, 2003 8:56 pm

Just returned from the Summer Conference of the NH Municipal Managers and learned from the Executive Director of the NH Bond Bank that they sold over $20M in new bonds last week at an average rate of 3.55% (!!) a full 1 percent below the rate used for library proposal in April. The good news is that the school district gets the benefit of the great rate. The bad news is it now is costing the taxpayers more to capital reserve than to build. :cry:
Tom Mahon
31 Naticook Road
Tom Mahon
 
Posts: 416
Joined: Fri Nov 22, 2002 12:28 pm

Postby MarkSaleski » Tue Aug 26, 2003 3:44 pm

a note on library fundraising:

the other day i heard an item on the radio that discussed a certain university library (can't remember where it was) that was short on funds.

they used the fact that kids seem to be interested in coffee/lattee/capucinio's, etc. and came up with a solution: they installed a starbucks franchise....and they sold a boatload of coffee. again, i can't remember the numbers but they were quite significant.

just something to think about (though personally, i'm not too thrilled with helping starbucks out...something local would be nice).
"Nothing in the world is more haughty than a man of moderate capacity when once raised to power." - Baron Wessenberg
MarkSaleski
 
Posts: 30
Joined: Thu Nov 21, 2002 4:54 pm

Postby Tom Mahon » Wed Aug 27, 2003 9:12 pm

Mark,
Thank you for your interest in the information that you noted. This aspect of the amenities that a library might have, has been a topic of discussion by the Building Committee. The committee is very aware of the changing nature of the library experience. On of the important aspects of the Library is the fact that it is a cultural and social center for all ages in the community. The plan presented to the voters last April takes these factors into account. Hence, you see a quiet area outside and a walkway that could provide a three season reading room that looks out on this open garden-type area. There is a small area under the stairs that has been tagged as a potential refreshment area. Finally, in the committee's consideration of the site adjacent to the Post Office, the proximity to retail establishments (DD, now the chocolate store, the pizza place and potentially others) weighed in favor of the site.

The Building Committee will be meeting on Wednesday, September 10th at 7 PM in the Library. Please join us as we renew our efforts to gain approval for this important community asset. I can be reached via e-mail or phone at 424-4189.

Regards,
Tom Mahon
31 Naticook Road
Tom Mahon
 
Posts: 416
Joined: Fri Nov 22, 2002 12:28 pm

Next year

Postby pointman » Mon May 17, 2004 2:40 pm

Perhaps next year we'll see a new group of organized tax payers.

The Merrimack Association to Set Free our Tax dollars.

Give up the notion of building an $8 million Library.

we would have to raise 3 times more than what the taxpayers have already put aside. Or we could borrow the money and put the taxpayers on the hook...woops. the trustees have already manuevered that it's already built in our tax rate...BUNK.

If we ask for money it raises our taxes. To prove my point, give back the $2.5 million and stop asking for more money in your line item budget. Keep everything the same and see if our taxes decrease.

Perhaps the trustees should use the Excel program more than the Powepoint program.
pointman
 
Posts: 60
Joined: Mon May 17, 2004 1:45 pm


Return to Cable, Library, Tolls & Water

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 2 guests

cron